In The News

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

The Los Angeles Times, Liam Dillon

Low-income housing developments in California could receive a continued infusion of public subsidies under proposals unveiled this week by state lawmakers.

Multiple new bills call for new funding for low-income housing through a revival of an urban redevelopment program and by increasing tax credits to fund new projects. Legislators have failed to pass versions of the same measures in years past, but have new hopes because Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom campaigned on spending more money on housing. They also point out the state budget’s bottom line remains strong.

Monday, December 3, 2018

Photo: Anne Wernikoff/KQED

KQED, Guy Marzorati

Democrats in the California state Legislature want to revive a controversial community renovation program, and with it, bring back billions of dollars for affordable housing.

The program, called redevelopment, was ended in 2011 by Gov. Jerry Brown and a Legislature intent on closing a massive budget hole. Democrats believe their proposal will get a boost next year by the support of the state's new governor, Gavin Newsom.

"We think it is the right time to bring back a new version of redevelopment," said Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco.

Friday, August 31, 2018

The San Francisco Chronicle Editorial Board

Friday was the official deadline for this year’s legislative session in Sacramento. Now it’s up to Gov. Jerry Brown to pick and choose the bills that become California law.  Brown is facing many important choices over the coming days and weeks.

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Photo: Michael Macor / The Chronicle

The San Francisco Chronicle, Melody Gutierrez

SACRAMENTO — Inmates who receive career training in automotive repair, cosmetology, construction and other fields would find it easier to find jobs in those professions once they leave lockup, under a bill headed to Gov. Jerry Brown.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Los Angeles Blade, Christopher Kane

With days remaining before the conclusion of California’s legislative session on Friday, August 31, the fate of at least 12 measures that concern the state’s LGBT community remains uncertain. Advocates are hopeful, though, that a string of recent victories will signal favorable outcomes. 

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

The San Francisco Chronicle, Rachel Swan

A bill to speed up the development of housing and retail on BART parking lots and other property is headed to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk, despite staunch oppostion from local political leaders around the East Bay.

Assembly Bill 2923 would require the transit agency to zone its parking lots and other vacant land for building construction and limit cities’ ability to get in the way. It would apply to any BART-owned land within half a mile of a station. Existing surface lots could be replaced with parking structures and new apartments and shops.

“We’re talking about surface parking lots that have not been developed for 45 years,” said Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, who co-authored the bill with Assemblyman Timothy Grayson, D-Concord.