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Thursday, August 30, 2018

Photo: Michael Macor / The Chronicle

The San Francisco Chronicle, Melody Gutierrez

SACRAMENTO — Inmates who receive career training in automotive repair, cosmetology, construction and other fields would find it easier to find jobs in those professions once they leave lockup, under a bill headed to Gov. Jerry Brown.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Los Angeles Blade, Christopher Kane

With days remaining before the conclusion of California’s legislative session on Friday, August 31, the fate of at least 12 measures that concern the state’s LGBT community remains uncertain. Advocates are hopeful, though, that a string of recent victories will signal favorable outcomes. 

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

The San Francisco Chronicle, Rachel Swan

A bill to speed up the development of housing and retail on BART parking lots and other property is headed to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk, despite staunch oppostion from local political leaders around the East Bay.

Assembly Bill 2923 would require the transit agency to zone its parking lots and other vacant land for building construction and limit cities’ ability to get in the way. It would apply to any BART-owned land within half a mile of a station. Existing surface lots could be replaced with parking structures and new apartments and shops.

“We’re talking about surface parking lots that have not been developed for 45 years,” said Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, who co-authored the bill with Assemblyman Timothy Grayson, D-Concord.

Monday, August 27, 2018

The San Francisco Chronicle, Melody Gutierrez

SACRAMENTO — San Francisco would be authorized to open safe injection facilities for illicit drug users to shoot up and ride out their high under clinical supervision, under a bill state lawmakers approved Monday.

Sunday, August 26, 2018

The San Francisco Chronicle Editorial Board

The state of California in general and the Bay Area in particular have a housing crisis, but you wouldn’t know it from the journey AB2923 has had through the state Legislature.

This bill, which was introduced by Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, and Tim Grayson, D-Concord, offers a simple way to add badly needed new housing where the Bay Area needs it most.

Friday, August 24, 2018

Los Angeles Sentinel News Service

As the initial wave of first-time, full-time students prepare to begin their newly-free classes at community colleges across California, Assembly leaders debuted a measure stating the legislature’s intent to waive fees for Year Two.  By doing so, an Associates Degree in California will effectively become free.

Friday, August 24, 2018

Curbed SF, Adam Brinklow

On Thursday the California State Senate passed AB 2923 on a 26-13 vote, potentially setting up BART to develop thousands or even tens of thousands of new homes on property it owns near stations within the next few years.

However, among the dissenting voices on the bill are several BART board members themselves.

The bill, introduced in February by Assemblymember David Chiu of San Francisco and East Bay rep Tim Grayson, would give the BART Board of Directors authority to create housing on land currently being used as BART parking.

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Sacramento, CA--A bill authored by Assemblymembers David Chiu (D-San Francisco) and Timothy S. Grayson (D-Concord) to encourage transit-oriented development (TOD) at certain Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) stations today passed the Senate Floor. Assembly Bill 2923 will require BART to set new standards for transit-oriented development on BART-owned land within a half mile of a BART station. To reduce delays, the bill requires local governments to update their own zoning to meet BART’s affordability and zoning standards.  

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

The San Francisco Chronicle, Rachel Swan

When Assemblyman David Chiu gazes at a moat of asphalt encircling a suburban BART station, he sees a solution to the region’s housing crisis.

Many BART parking lots fill with cars during the day and turn into empty moonscapes at night, wasting prime land that could be lined with apartments and shops, with compact parking structures for riders, said Chiu, D-San Francisco. Though others share this vision, development of BART parking lots is a contentious issue: Bickering over height limits, aesthetics and parking spaces has long hobbled the transit agency’s ability to get it done.

Chiu is pressing a bill that aims to fix the problem by requiring BART to zone its vacant property for housing and retail, and limiting cities’ ability to obstruct or delay that development.